Gender and Race Benchmark Analysis

Welcome to the results of the Gender and Race Benchmark 2014, the most comprehensive survey available of gender and race equality in the workplace.  2014 is the third year of the combined Gender and Race Benchmark, with 114 organisations submitting confidential data - a 70% increase from 2012 when it was launched.  As part of the Benchmark we release Trends analysis and four unranked Top 10 lists of the best performing public and private sector organisations for gender and race.

The 2014 Benchmark analysis confirms our advice to employers has delivered. Progress is driven from the top, change needs to be embedded into core processes, and line managers play a crucial role in creating equal work cultures. We know what works. We now need more organisations from every sector to use this knowledge and take action to close a gender employment gap that has no place in our 21st century workforce.

- Kathryn Nawrockyi,
Director, Opportunity Now

This year the Gender and Race Benchmark 2014 analysis is being released in stages, starting with three papers that focus on the issues of Progression and Leadership, Performance and Appraisal and Bullying and Harassment, which reveal that:

It is rewarding that our benchmarking organisations are outperforming the rest of the country in progressing ethnic minorities into senior management positions. Public targets, transparency on progression criteria, equality-proofed competencies for progression, and greater support for line managers are what I want to see continued progress on for 2015. The Benchmark reiterates just want employers need to do to ensure they are fit for an ethnically diverse future.

- Sandra Kerr OBE,
Director, Race for Opportunity

  • BAME employees are less likely to be rated in the top two performance rating categories
  • Women and BAME employees are less likely to be identified as ‘high potential’ or be selected for leadership training overall
  • The public sector is more likely to identify women and men as ‘high potential’ in similar proportions
  • BAME women are least likely to hold an executive directorship and an non-executive directorship; yet BAME women are more likely to be promoted than BAME men at other levels
  • Actions that correlate most strongly with higher promotion rates for women are all ones that need to be embedded into core operational process and driven from the top

The benchmark data also allows us to identify success factors to improve performance on gender and race, including:

  • Transparency in selection criteria
  • Equality-proofed core competencies
  • Competency based frameworks
  • Line manager training in diversity and inclusion, and line managers promote BAME / gender related initiatives to women and BAME employees in their teams
  • Unconscious bias training for recruitment panels
  • Dedicated progression programmes for women and BAME employees

A core part of the Benchmark is publishing four unranked Top 10 lists of the best performing private and public sector organisations for race and gender. There are four new entries for 2014. Find out the Top 10 public and private organisations for race and the Top 10 public and private organisations for gender.  

Kathryn Nawrockyi, Opportunity Now director, Business in the Community, said: “The 2014 Benchmark analysis confirms our advice to employers has delivered. Progress is driven from the top, change needs to be embedded into core processes, and line managers play a crucial role in creating equal work cultures. We know what works. We now need more organisations from every sector to use this knowledge and take action to close a gender employment gap that has no place in our 21st century workforce.”

Sandra Kerr OBE, Race for Opportunity director, Business in the Community, said: “It is rewarding that our benchmarking organisations are outperforming the rest of the country in progressing ethnic minorities into senior management positions. Public targets, transparency on progression criteria, equality-proofed competencies for progression, and greater support for line managers are what I want to see continued progress on for 2015. The Benchmark reiterates just want employers need to do to ensure they are fit for an ethnically diverse future.”

Employers choose to participate in the benchmark as it enables them to analyse their workplace practices and inform targeted change. Each participating receives a bespoke and in-depth analysis report on how they are performing on diversity, equality and inclusion.

Coming soon:

  • Benchmark Trend: Fair Pay - in-depth analysis due February 2015
  • Benchmark Trend: Recruitment - in-depth analysis due February 2015
  • Benchmark Trend: Agile Working - in-depth analysis due May 2015
  • Benchmark Trend: Strategy and Business case - analysis due May 2015