DRIVERS: research on addressing health inequalities via fair employment, early childhood development and social protection

Business in the Community is participating in a major pan European research study (2012-15), funded by the EU 7th Framework Porgramme, into three key drivers for health: fair employment, social protection and early childhood development.

This research project will build on the growing body of evidence, including that set out in the Marmot Review Fair Society, Healthy Lives, that reducing health inequalities requires action in many policy areas from early childhood to employment and living standards. It will focus on three of the main drivers or 'social determinants' that lie behind health inequalities to review the evidence and make recommendations to reduce health inequalities.

Business in the Community is participating, alongside academic and non-academic partners, in the project with a focus on working conditions and fair employment. Work represents a source of income and social protection, helps determine social status, expands access to social networks and exposes a person to different types of physical and mental stresses. It is central to people’s lives and has the potential to significantly affect health both at the individual and population level. Specific work Business in the Community will undertake include research with employers on what employer interventions make a difference to those with barriers to work as they seeek to gain and sustain work.

The research is being  undertaken by a consortium of research bodies – University College London, Dusseldorf University and the CHESS (Swedish Centre for Health Equity Studies) – in partnership with organisations representing the public health sector, civil society and business (EuroHealthNet, Eurochild, Business in the Community and the European Anti-Poverty Network). The project will be managed by EuroHealthNet.

For more information see the project website http://health-gradient.eu/

To find out more about getting involved in the research please contact Stephanie Hagan